Artist Creates Artworks Out Of Human Hair And Dust

The incredibly talented Japanese artist, Takahiro Iwasaki, has recently began creating a completely unique, and indescribably detailed body of work. His current piece, which was part of an exhibit this past year at the Kawasaki City Museum, entitled “Out Of Disorder” is designed using cloth fibers, human hair, and dust.

Via

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Monkey wigs the new cover-up to a dodgy haircut? Or a pleasant Art appearance!

M1Fashion Designer Nikoline Liv Andersen. 1979 works in the border zone between art, craft and design with an emphasis on quality craftsmanship. Although the Monkey Wigs series might trigger some sort of a spontaneous outburst of a giggle, far deeper thoughts are laid within these beautifully crafted works of art.

“The Dance of the Deaf and Dumb Eye.” With inspiration from the classic Japanese monkeys, which have been interpreted in the West as a naive attempt to shut out the outside world by refusing to see, hear or speak, these clothing sculptures contain visual references to the French court under Louis XVI, during whose reign excessive abundance and poor communication between nobility and citizenry led to the French Revolution. With this in mind, the monkey trinity is drawn into a contemporary rococo, where globalization is skewed by imbalanced capitalism, dangerous balances of power and a stubborn struggle between religion and freedom of speech. The monkeys become narrative symbols of today’s blind consumers and the historical Marie Antoinette.”

“The lovely Nikoline expresses herself artistically in experimental and uncompromising fashion design, creating magical universes with one-off pieces that represent many hours of work, often in unconventional materials. Nikoline Liv Andersen seeks to challenge not only our view of design and clothing but our perception of the world around us in works that addresses ethical aspects of political and social issues.”


Via Mind Craft

Love Food? Love Art? Foodscapes by Carl Warner

Carl Warner was born in Liverpool, England in 1963.

The ‘Foodscapes’ are created in Carl’s London studio where they are built on top of a large purpose built triangular table top. The scenes are photographed in layers from foreground to background and sky as the process is very time consuming and so the food quickly wilts under the lights. Each element is then put together in post production to achieve the final image.

“Although I’m very hands on with my work, I do use model makers and food stylists to help me create the sets. I tend to start with a drawing which I sketch out in order to get the composition worked out, this acts as a blue print for the team to work to.”

Enjoy Carl Warner’s Foodscapes!

Bread Village

Bread Village

Corn Candle

Corn Candle

Candy Cottage

Candy Cottage

The Majan Pepper Temple

The Majan Pepper Temple

The Onion Taj Mahal

The Onion Taj Mahal

Great wall of Pineapple

Great wall of Pineapple

Pencil Sculptures by Jennifer Maestre

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“My sculptures were originally inspired by the form and function of the sea urchin. The spines of the urchin, so dangerous yet beautiful, serve as an explicit warning against contact. The alluring texture of the spines draws the touch in spite of the possible consequences. The tension unveiled, we feel push and pull, desire and repulsion. The sections of pencils present aspects of sharp and smooth for two very different textural and aesthetic experiences. Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials. Quantities of industrially manufactured objects are used to create flexible forms reminiscent of the organic shapes of animals and nature. Pencils are common objects, here, these anonymous objects become the structure. There is true a fragility to the sometimes brutal aspect of the sculptures, vulnerability that is belied by the fearsome texture.” – Jennifer Maestre

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Urs Fischer – artist of the big gesture!

Born in 1973, Urs Fischer began his career in Switzerland where he studied photography at the Schule fur Gestaltung, Zurich. He moved to Amsterdam in 1993 and had his first solo show at a gallery in Zurich, in 1996. Fischers subversive approach to art is often considered to be influenced by anti-art movements like Neo-Dada, Lost Art or the Situationist International. Since Fischer began showing his work, in the mid-nineteen-nineties, in Europe, he has produced an enormous number of objects, drawings, collages, and room-size installations.

Urs Fisher

Urs Fisher

Urs Fisher

Urs Fisher

Via: Urs Fisher